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Remarkable images show construction of Katrine Aqueducts

Pictures dating from Victorian times were discovered in a skip.

By STV News

Published 28 Feb 2019.

Remarkable images of the construction of one of Scotland's most important engineering achievements have been saved after being tossed into a skip.

The pictures show construction of the two aqueducts which bring water from Loch Katrine down to Glasgow.

The aqueducts were built 160 years ago, and continue to transfer clean water to the city today.

Until now, little has been known about the men who built the Katrine Aqueducts - but the images give a glimpse as to just how hard the work was.

Remarkably the pictures - comprising a series of glass slides - were almost lost when they were tossed into a skip after Scottish Water moved offices.

They were only recovered when technician Steve Walker noticed them among a pile of rubble, and are now being made public as a multi-million pound refurbishment of the aqueducts gets under way.

The slides include images of workers boring through rocky mountainsides with drills during the construction of the 23.5 mile-long second aqueduct, which began in 1885 and was completed in 1901 to increase capacity and meet demand as the population of Glasgow burgeoned to more than one million.

Until now, little has been known about the men who built the Katrine Aqueducts - but the images give a glimpse as to just how hard the work was.

Remarkably the pictures - comprising a series of glass slides - were almost lost when they were tossed into a skip after Scottish Water moved offices.

They were only recovered when technician Steve Walker noticed them among a pile of rubble, and are now being made public as a multi-million pound refurbishment of the aqueducts gets under way.

The slides include images of workers boring through rocky mountainsides with drills during the construction of the 23.5 mile-long second aqueduct, which began in 1885 and was completed in 1901 to increase capacity and meet demand as the population of Glasgow burgeoned to more than one million.

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